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  • WorkInTheNetherlands.nl Admin
    Netherlands has the highest number of job vacancies ever

    According to Statistics Netherlands, this summer is seeing an all-time high in the number of open job vacancies.

    Numbers of open job vacancies in the Netherlands have been rising for five years to date, with the massive increase of 16,000 in this year’s second quarter breaking the previous record set in 2007. At the end of June this year some 251,000 job openings were recorded, topping the 251,000 in the same 2007 quarter. The only sector to see a loss in the number of advertised jobs was banking and finance, with the education, industry and business services sectors all showing gains. The situation is causing some concern, as labour market tensions are also on the increase as demand for employment is up against a limited supply of suitable positions.

    Some 354,000 workers are now unemployed, a small decrease of 14,000 on results from the first quarter of 2018. Many who’ve been unemployed for a while are now job-hunting again, and would-be expats looking to make a move to the Netherlands could well find the jobs bonanza is good news. Recruitment agencies are relied on by many Dutch companies looking for expatriate professionals, with some offering job interview coaching for potential employees unused to finding work overseas. Expats can register with just one or as many as they like, thus increasing their chances of finding the right position at an acceptable salary.

    For expats who’ve identified companies they’d love to work for, it’s usual in the Netherlands to simply apply by letter for an interview. Checking the company’s website for the right person to apply to makes certain your application will be taken seriously. Although usually confined to top-level positions in international firms, vacancies are regularly published in Dutch newspapers including Telegraf, Metro and NRC. Another well-known way to get the job you want is by networking, either by using social media or personal contacts or by joining a professional association or networking group. If all else fails, Amsterdam’s twice-yearly International Jobs Fair is certain to succeed.
    Netherlands has the highest number of job vacancies ever

    According to Statistics Netherlands, this summer is seeing an all-time high in the number of open job vacancies.

    Numbers of open job vacancies in the Netherlands have been rising for five years to date, with the ...See more
    Netherlands has the highest number of job vacancies ever  | Emigrate News | Emigrate UK
    Netherlands has the highest number of job vacancies ever | Emigrate News | Emigrate UK
    Netherlands has the highest number of job vacancies ever | Emigrate News | Emigrate UK
  • WorkInTheNetherlands.nl Admin
    The Netherlands Fines Welfare Recipients Who Don’t Dress Appropriately. Guess How That’s Going.

    In the United States, depending on which state you’re in, you can lose access to welfare for a variety of reasons—not getting a job quickly enough, living with someone with a criminal background, or failing a drug test. In the Netherlands, while people usually don’t lose welfare altogether, they could still be fined—in some cases, for not looking or smelling good enough to be employable. And one Dutch researcher who studied the impact of this policy in its first two years says it’s leading to some arbitrary and sexist fines.

    The act that governs welfare in the Netherlands was updated in 2015 to include many new restrictions, including a policy that says that those who hurt their chances of employment through the way they dress, groom, and behave—for example, ragged clothing, strong body odor, or irrational behavior—could be fined, sometimes hundreds of euros a month for several months, if the welfare worker he or she encounters isn’t satisfied.

    Although welfare is becoming more conditional on many factors in other countries, rules about appearance—the idea that recipients should look worthy of this money—aren’t usually formalized. “It’s less and less a right and is more and more where you have to perform certain behaviors and practices. But as far as we know, the Netherlands is the only country where they made it into written law,” says Marguerite van den Berg, a social researcher at the University of Amsterdam who studies dress and presentation in the labor market and how this affects women, and recently how this code is being carried out in practice.

    The aesthetic code update to the Netherlands’ welfare policy was a small piece of a larger restructuring. The revision shifts responsibility to the municipalities instead of the central government, and it restructures welfare so it’s tied more closely to an individual’s employment journey, a way to hold him or her over while finding a new job and getting off welfare. But even with an aesthetic condition, the Netherlands still has an all-encompassing safety net, which is much more robust than the United States’. Before people end up on welfare, they first get unemployment benefits for up to 38 months. (Unemployment is capped at 26 weeks in the U.S.) Moreover, it is actually unknown how many people are actually fined for “inappropriate” dress or behavior. “The law is quite extreme, but at the same time it’s not as if people left and right are getting sanctions for the way they look,” said van den Berg. “This law is, however, used as a threat to have people change their appearance.”

    The aesthetic code is just one change among many making the Netherlands’ policy look more and more like the U.S.’ (and restrictions here continue to multiply).

    Certain parts of these reforms, such as teaching people about appropriate professional attire, provide guidance people might not get elsewhere that could help them find work. But according to van den Berg’s March 2018 study, welfare recipients were subjected to caseworker decisions that often seemed random. For example, one man was fined for showing up to an interview for a construction-industry job dressed in a suit.

    The policy, van den Berg found, also has sexist implications. It seems especially destined to hurt women, who get judged more on the way they look and already spend more time on nearly all aspects of their appearance than men do. Moreover, when women wear the same thing every day, they’re likely to be scrutinized and criticized for not caring about their appearance, so they have to do this work again and again.

    Van den Berg and her colleagues note that caseworkers paid special attention to women’s cleavage, emphasizing to female welfare recipients that the perception of them is changed when they’re not covered up. The researchers describe the caseworkers’ approach: “Sometimes you see a photo on a CV and you see too much of a woman’s cleavage. Then, in interaction with the client, I try to show her: ‘Look, do you see the difference between when I put my hand over your cleavage in the photo and when you can see the cleavage?

    This is how you learn how you come across.’ ” Van den Berg calls this pressure “aesthetic labor,” which she defines as the everyday (and usually unpaid) labor of presenting the way required by society. “There’s much more ambiguity for women when it comes to dressing, and that’s not only the case for working women, but all around. … Is my dress too short? Can I show my shoulders? Are sandals OK?” says van den Berg.

    Poverty, the very force putting people on welfare, is a gendered issue. Most of the world’s poor are women, and women are more likely to rely on welfare than men. In the Netherlands, the number of female-headed households in poverty began rising rapidly in the late 1980s, with more than 60 percent of households with long-term low income headed by a woman. They were more likely to be the sole caregiver for small children, so any money they get is spread thinner and it is more difficult for them to participate in the paid labor market. This means women are more likely to need welfare and then more likely to be judged and fined for the way they look.

    And by putting the focus on participants’ dress, the reforms take the focus off structural causes of unemployment and poverty and place it onto superficial issues—including teaching welfare recipients to deal with uncertain economic situations by practicing optimism and positive thinking and telling them to following their dreams, according to a February 2018 study by van den Berg. And of course, the policy furthers the notion that people are on welfare because they haven’t been making the right choices or navigating the job market the way they should be.

    Over the past few decades, but especially after the Great Recession, personal responsibility has become a crucial part of welfare systems around the world, and a country like the Netherlands moving in that direction is particularly concerning. “It’s important that we have welfare. But when you use that welfare, it’s expected of you that you do what you can do to reduce your reliance on welfare. It’s a two-way street,” says Rotterdam Vice Mayor Maarten Struijvenberg, of the right-wing party Leefbaar Rotterdam (Livable Rotterdam), who is responsible for the city’s economic affairs.

    And if that’s the case, the changes don’t look good. Especially for women.
    The Netherlands Fines Welfare Recipients Who Don’t Dress Appropriately. Guess How That’s Going.

    In the United States, depending on which state you’re in, you can lose access to welfare for a variety of reasons—not getting a job quickly enough, living with someone with a criminal backg...See more
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    Aug 6 '18
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  • WorkInTheNetherlands.nl Admin
    Netherlands Told to Reduce Differences in Employee Regulations

    T he Dutch economy is growing steadily and is expected to continue growing in the next two years, but employees in the Netherlands are not sufficiently benefiting from this growth, the OECD—the global organization that examines the social and economic policy of its member countries—said in its report on the state of the Netherlands economy.

    An important reason for workers in the Netherlands not feeling the economic growth, is the large number of freelancers and self-employed people in the country. In other OECD countries the number of freelancers mainly decreased since 2005, but in the Netherlands it increased significantly, NOS reported.

    Because there are no minimum rates for freelancers and they do not have a strong negotiating position, their wages and employment conditions are under pressure. This is not only detrimental for the freelancers themselves, but also has a negative effect on the bargaining position of people in paid employment, according to the OECD.

    To solve this, the OECD advises the Netherlands to reduce the differences in regulations for employees and freelancers. Reduce the tax benefits for freelancers and introduce social insurance for them, the organization proposes.

    The OECD also thinks the Netherlands should make its dismissal law more flexible, to make it easier for employers to employ people.

    The OECD also mentioned a number of risks that could threaten the Dutch economy on the medium term. In the Netherlands itself, the rapidly rising house prices pose a problem. If housing prices suddenly drop, many people could fall into financial trouble.

    The other risks are mainly across the border. Increasing protectionism in the world can cause a huge shock to the Dutch open economy, the OECD said, pointing to mutual trade tariffs between the United States and the European Union as a sign of this.

    Angel Gurria, the OECD chief, is not worried about the specific import tariffs on steel and aluminum, but warns that these tariffs point to something bigger. “It is about the negative effect these measures have on the global trade and investment climate. If people do not have confidence in that climate, many investment opportunities and jobs will be lost”, he said, according to NOS.

    Brexit also poses a major risk to the Dutch economy, according to the OECD. If there are significant trade restrictions between the Netherlands and Britain, the Netherlands’ gross domestic product will fall between 1.25% and 4.25%, the organization estimates.

    The OECD advises the Netherlands to prepare for lean years and to use the current favorable economic climate to build financial buffers as much as possible.
    Netherlands Told to Reduce Differences in Employee Regulations

    T he Dutch economy is growing steadily and is expected to continue growing in the next two years, but employees in the Netherlands are not sufficiently benefiting from this growth, the OECD—the global organization that ex...See more
    Netherlands Told to Reduce Differences in Employee Regulations | Financial Tribune
    Netherlands Told to Reduce Differences in Employee Regulations | Financial Tribune
    The Dutch economy is growing steadily and is expected to continue growing in the next two years, but...
    Jul 7 '18
    0 0
  • WorkInTheNetherlands.nl Admin
    Practical steps to working legally in the Netherlands

    If you’ve decided to try working in the Netherlands or have been offered a post that's too good to refuse, you’ll have realised Dutch bureaucracy is some of the toughest in Europe.

    If you’ve already found a job and are intending to stay in the county of over three months, your employer will need to apply for your residence permit unless you’re a citizen of the European Union, the European Economic Area or Switzerland. There are several types of residence permit, linked to the skill level and nature of the job you’ve been offered. It might be quicker for your employer to apply for a joint residence/work permit known as the Single Permit, based on legal criteria and your unique skills for the job.

    Experienced expat professionals with unique, much-needed skills who’ve been offered a high salary will need an officially recognised sponsor in order to get their residency and work permit. The procedure is faster than the basic residency/work permit described above.
    In certain cases, non-EU graduates can apply as highly skilled migrants for a one-year orientation, thus giving them time to assess the Netherlands’ labour market without having to get a work permit.

    Once you’re legally in the country, you’ll need to register at your local municipality in order to get a BSN personal ID number. As regards your employment contract, it should be examined carefully before signing, possibly with help from a specialist in employment law. Terms should include your exact role, working hours, salary and other benefits, overtime and bonuses as well as social security and pension contributions. A trial period if any and end of contract terms should also be included. The Dutch tax system is complicated, even without the current row over the changing of the 30 per cent tax-free ruling for expat professionals. If you need to find out the current financial value of your contract, professional help is probably the best way.
    Practical steps to working legally in the Netherlands

    If you’ve decided to try working in the Netherlands or have been offered a post that's too good to refuse, you’ll have realised Dutch bureaucracy is some of the toughest in Europe.

    If you’ve already found a job and ...See more
    Practical steps to working legally in the Netherlands  | Emigrate News | Emigrate UK
    Practical steps to working legally in the Netherlands | Emigrate News | Emigrate UK
    Practical steps to working legally in the Netherlands | Emigrate News | Emigrate UK
  • WorkInTheNetherlands.nl Admin
    Netherlands – Labour migrants from Central and Eastern Europe fill nearly 1 in 20 jobs, ABU finds

    Labour migrants filled 514,000 different jobs in the Netherlands in 2016, with more than half of them temporary jobs, according to a report from the Dutch Federation of Private Employment Agencies (ABU).

    In total there were 371,000 thousand labour migrants from Central and Eastern Europe in 2016, of whom 183,000 were temporary workers (49%). Together they completed a total of 514,000 different jobs, nearly 1 in 20 jobs in the country, of which 275,000 were temporary jobs (54%).

    The labour migrants were particularly active in agriculture and horticulture, business services, logistics, wholesale trade, the food industry and the metal industry.

    According to research from ABU, migrant workers make a substantial contribution to production in the Netherlands and contribute approximately €11 billion to its national income.

    “The research also shows that migrant workers primarily provide additional employment, production and income. Without employing these employees, employers expect to adjust, restrict or relocate their production process. ABU director Jurriën Koops: "This indicates that the Netherlands badly needs labour migrants. Without them, economic growth stagnates, both nationally and regionally. "

    "The need for migrant workers will only increase in the coming years. Because of the growing economy. But especially also because from 2021 our workforce is shrinking. Migrant workers are simply needed to keep the labor force up to standard. But then, as a country of residence, we should remain attractive for this group of employees,” Koops said.

    Koops also added that finding housing for labour migrants is a problem that must be addressed.

    “The temporary employment sector plays an important role in the mediation of labor migrants: nearly half of them find work through an employment agency,” ABU stated. “That is why the ABU, as an employers' organisation in the temporary employment sector, calls on municipal and provincial authorities to work with temporary employment agencies and housing companies on housing for labor migrants. Because only then can the various regions remain attractive for companies and foreign employees.”
    Source: staffingindustry.com
    Netherlands – Labour migrants from Central and Eastern Europe fill nearly 1 in 20 jobs, ABU finds

    Labour migrants filled 514,000 different jobs in the Netherlands in 2016, with more than half of them temporary jobs, according to a report from the Dutch Federation of Private Employment...See more
  • WorkInTheNetherlands.nl Admin
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    Principle Consultant BPM
    The below presents an exciting, life changing opportunity for the successful candidate The jobs I am currently sourcing for can be based at any of th...
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    Please post your vacancies on our website www.WorkInTheNetherlands.nl
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Expat employment agencies
    www.bluelynx.nl www.undutchables.nl www.bilingualpeople.nl www.expatriates.com/classifieds/netherlands/jobs/ www.multilingualvacancies...
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Informatie over werkgeversen branches
    www.jaarverslag.com www.bedrijven.pagina.nl
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Newspapers (jobs)
    www.volkskrantbanen.nl www.gelderlander.nl www.trouw.nl/vacatures www.nrc.nl
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Startpagina’s jobs
    www.carrierestart.nl www.carriere.pagina.nl www.solliciteren.pagina.nl www.cv.pagina.nl www.werkloos.pagina.nl www.vacature.pagina....
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    Law & Legal jobs (Juridisch)
    www.jbb.nl www.nl.hudson.com www.legalworkforce.nl www.njb.nl www.openbaarministerie.nl www.advocatenorde.nl www.robberts.nl
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Healthcare jobs (Gezondheidszorg)
    www.ziekenhuis.nl www.artsenmediair.com www.medjob.nl www.zorgbanen.nl www.zorgonly.nl www.zorgpersoneel.nl www.zorghart.nl w...
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Agencies
    www.interkosmos.nl www.humanforzagroup.nl www.depopersoneel.nl www.arto.nl www.vitae.nl www.octagon.nl www.vankoppen-vaneijk.nl ...
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    WorkInTheNetherlands.nl posted a forum topic
    Part time jobs
    www.parttimevacatures.net www.parttimewerk.nl www.megajobs.nl/00/MJ/nl/nieuws/436/banen_Parttime_vacatures_werk.html www.parttime-vacatur...
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